Illinois Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry  
Illinois Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry

Pat Quinn, Governor

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  Frequently Asked Questions  

  1. What offenses are subject to Violent Offender Against Youth Registration?
  2. Other Qualifying Criteria for registration
  3. How can an individual be transferred from the Illinois Sex Offender Registry to the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry?
  4. What does sexually motivated mean?
  5. If an offender transfers to the Violent Offender Against Youth Registry from the Sex Offender Registry, does the 10-year registration requirement start over?
  6. How long must an offender remain registered as a sex offender and how often are they required to register?
  7. Is there a registration fee when registering under the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act?
  8. I know an individual was convicted of one of these offenses, but the person does not appear on this website.
  9. Where does an offender register? Must an offender register if they move? live to a school?
  10. If an offender is visiting from another state, are they required to register?
  11. Are violent offenders allowed on school grounds?
  12. Are schools provided with registered offender information?
  13. How close can a child sex offender live to a school?
  14. Are sex offenders allowed in parks?
  15. Can an offender live with children?
  16. As a victim of an offense, can I be notified of an offender's whereabouts? How do I sign up to receive notification?
  17. How do I obtain offense information in addition to what is listed on the web site?
  18. How do photos get posted on the website? Why do some offenders not have a photo on file?
  19. What does Non-Compliant mean?
  20. What is Location Unknown mean?

   Questions & Answers  

  1. What offenses are subject to Violent Offender Against Youth Registration?

    1. Any conviction or adjudication of any of the following statutes require registration:

      • Kidnapping (720 ILCS 5/10-1), if the victim is under age 18 and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1996;
      • Aggravated Kidnapping (720 ILCS 5/10-2), if the victim is under age 18 and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1996 ;
      • Unlawful Restraint (720 ILCS 5/10-3), if the victim is under age 18 and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1996;
      • Aggravated Unlawful Restraint (720 ILCS 5/10-3.1), if the victim is under age 18 and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1996;
      • Domestic Battery (720 ILCS 5/12-3.2) resulting in bodily harm, when the defendant was 18 years or older and the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1996 and the conviction is on or after July 26, 2010;
      • Aggravated Domestic Battery (720 ILCS 5/12-3.3), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18.
      • Aggravated Battery (720 ILCS 5/12-4(a), (b)(1), (b)(14)), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Heinous Battery (720 ILCS 5/12-4.1), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18.;
      • Aggravated Battery of a Child (720 ILCS 5/12-4.3) when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Aggravated Battery of an Unborn Child (720 ILCS 5/12-4.4), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Ritualized Abuse of a Child (720 ILCS 5/12-33), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) July 26, 2000 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) July 26, 2010 and the defendant was under the age of 18.
      • Aggravated Battery with a firearm (720 ILCS 5/12-4.2), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) August 1, 2001 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) August 1, 2011 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Aggravated Battery with a Machine Gun (720 ILCS 5/12-4.2-5), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) August 1, 2001 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) August 1, 2011 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Home Invasion (720 ILCS 5/12-11), when the victim was under 18 years of age and the offense was committed on or after (1) August 1, 2001 if the defendant was 18 years of age or older or (2) August 1, 2011 and the defendant was under the age of 18;
      • Child Abduction by luring a child under 16 into a vehicle or building and the offense was committed on or after January 1, 1998;
      • Forcible Detention, if the victim is under age 18, and the offense was committed on or after July 1, 1999;
      • First Degree Murder of a Child, when the defendant is at least 17 years of age at the time of the offense and the victim is under age 18. Applies to a person who committed the offense before June 1, 1996 only if the person was incarcerated in the Illinois Department of Corrections on August 20, 2004;
      • First Degree Murder of an Adult, when the victim was a person 18 years of age of older at the time of the commission of the offense. Applies to a person who was released from the Illinois Department of Corrections on or after January 1, 2002.   
      • Any attempts to commit any of the offenses listed above.


  2. Other Qualifying Criteria for registration:

    • The offender is found not guilty by reason of insanity;
    • The offender is the subject of a finding not resulting in an acquittal;
    • A conviction or adjudication for a violation of federal law, the law of another state, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, or a foreign country law that is substantially equivalent to the offenses listed above;
    • A juvenile is adjudicated delinquent for any of the offenses listed above; or


  3. How can an individual be transferred from the Illinois Sex Offender Registry to the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry?
  4. First Degree Murder of a Child, Kidnapping, Aggravated Kidnapping, Unlawful Restraint, Aggravated Unlawful Restraint, Child Abduction, and Forcible Detention are offenses which are eligible for transfer from the Sex Offender Registry to the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registry when the following stipulations are met according to 730 ILCS 15/11:

    • The sole offense requiring registration was a conviction or adjudication for an offense or offenses listed previously. If the individual has a conviction for an offense which requires sex offender registration, this individual will continue to register under the Sex Offender Registration Act and is not eligible for transferring to this registry.
    • The State’s Attorney’s Office in the county in which the individual was convicted has verified, on the form prescribed by the Illinois State Police, that the crime that required or requires registration was not sexually motivated. (Sexually motivated is defined as one or more of the facts of the underlying offense indicates conduct that is of a sexual nature or that shows an intent to engage in behavior of a sexual nature.)
    • The completed form has been received by the registering law enforcement agency and the Illinois State Police Sex Offender Registration Unit.
    • If the individual was convicted in the military, out-of-state, or in federal court, it remains the responsibility of the offender to have this form completed and verified by the county of your conviction.


  5. What does sexually motivated mean?
  6. Section 10 of the Illinois Sex Offender Management Board Act states "sexually motivated" means one or more of the facts of the underlying offense indicates conduct that is of a sexual nature or that shows an intent to engage in behavior of a sexual nature.


  7. If an offender transfers to the Violent Offender Against Youth Registry from the Sex Offender Registry, does the 10-year registration requirement start over?
  8. Transferring to the new registry will not extend your registration requirements in Illinois.


  9. How long must an offender remain registered and how often are they required to register?
  10. An offender must register in person annually for a period of 10 years. The 10-year registration period will start for those offenders sentenced to probation upon conviction. Those offenders sentenced to the Illinois Department of Corrections, another state's department of corrections, or federal corrections must register for 10 years from final parole, discharge, or release.

    Those offenders convicted of first degree murder must register annually for their natural life.

    An offender must register in person once a year. The offender must re-register within 1 year of the date of their last registration and every year thereafter.

    If an offender fails to register on or before his last registration date, the ten-year registration requirement will start over. The Director of the State Police has the authority to administratively start over the registration requirements for any offender who violates any provision of this Act.

    Upon completion of an offender's 10-year registration period, their information will no longer appear on the web site.

  11. Is there a registration fee when registering under the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act?

    Yes, there is a one-time initial registration fee of $20 to be paid the very first time a registrant registers under this Act and an annual registration fee of $10 to be paid once each year.


  12. I know an individual was convicted of one of these offenses, but the person does not appear on this website.
  13. You should do a search of the Illinois State Police Sex Offender Registry. This individual may have an offense which requires sex offender registration. If this is the case, the individual must continue to register as a sex offender and will appear on the sex offender registry until law enforcement officials have received the case facts verification form from the state’s attorney and will then transfer the individual to this registry. If an individual has completed the 10 year registration requirement, the person has been removed from the registry and will no longer appear on the website.


  14. Where does an offender register? Must an offender register if they move?
  15. An offender must register with the law enforcement agency having jurisdiction where they reside. If the offender lives within the city limits, he or she will register with the city police department. If the offender resides in an unincorporated area, he or she will register with the county sheriff's office.

    An offender must register any and all places he or she resides for a period of 5 or more days in a calendar year. If an offender changes his or her address, he or she must inform the local law enforcement agency in which they reside of the move, and the law enforcement agency in which they are moving to within 5 days of that move.


  16. If an offender is visiting from another state, are they required to register?
  17. An offender visiting the State of Illinois for more than 5 days in a calendar year will be required to register with the local law enforcement jurisdiction where the offender is staying. This means cumulative days; it does not necessarily have to be 5 consecutive days.


  18. Are violent offenders or sex offenders allowed on school grounds?

    According to the Illinois Criminal Code (720 ILCS 5/11-9.3 and 9.4), if a person was convicted of child abduction, kidnapping, aggravated kidnapping, unlawful restraint, aggravated unlawful restraint, ritualized abuse of a child or an attempt to commit any of these offenses, this individual is considered a child sex offender no matter which registry the person is registering under.

    It is unlawful for a child sex offender to be present in any school building or property, or loiter within 500 feet of school property without the permission of the superintendent or school board, or in the case of a private school the principal unless the child sex offender is a parent of a child at that school, and the parent is on school grounds for one of the following reasons:

    • to attend a conference at the school with school personnel to discuss the progress of his or her child academically or socially;
    • to participate in child review conferences in which evaluation and placement decisions may be made with respect to his or her child regarding special education services;
    • to attend conferences to discuss other student issues concerning his or her child such as retention and promotion; or
    • the offender's voting place is the school.



  19. Are schools provided with registered offender information?
  20. The Illinois State Police receives addresses of schools from the State Board of Education on a quarterly basis. This information is sent out to the Illinois Sheriff's Departments who are responsible for providing a list of sex offenders in their county to the superintendent/school board of the public schools, and the principal of the private schools. In the city of Chicago, the police department is responsible for school notification.


  21. How close can a child sex offender live to a school?
  22. According to the Illinois Criminal Code (720 ILCS 5/11-9.3 and 9.4), if a person was convicted of child abduction, kidnapping, aggravated kidnapping, unlawful restraint, aggravated unlawful restraint or an attempt to commit any of these offenses, this individual is considered a child sex offender.

    It is unlawful for a child sex offender to reside within 500 feet of a school, playground, or any facility providing programs or services exclusively directed toward people under age 18, unless they owned the property prior to July 7, 2000.

    It is unlawful for a child sex offender to knowingly reside within 500 feet of the victim of the sex offense.

  23. Are sex offenders allowed in parks?

    As of January 1, 2011, it is unlawful for a sexual predator or a child sex offender to knowingly be present in any public park building or on the real property comprising any public park. The definition of public park includes a park, forest preserve, or conservation area under the jurisdiction of the state or unit of local government. A person who violates this is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.

    According to the Illinois Criminal Code (720 ILCS 5/11-9.3 and 9.4), if a person was convicted of child abduction, kidnapping, aggravated kidnapping, unlawful restraint, aggravated unlawful restraint or an attempt to commit any of these offenses, this individual is considered a child sex offender.

  24. Can an offender live with children?
  25. There is nothing in the Sex Offender Registration Act or the Murderer and Violent Offender Against Youth Registration Act that prohibits a child sex offender or a violent offender against youth from being around children, unless it is at a park, school, or any location designed exclusively for people under the age of 18. If you would like a further investigation into the welfare of a child present in the same house as an offender, you should contact the Department of Children and Family Services. The Department of Children and Family Service Hotline is 800-25-ABUSE.


  26. As a victim of an offense, can I be notified of an offender's whereabouts? How do I sign up to receive notification?
  27. A victim and the victim's parent or legal guardian may request automatic notification of the change of address of the associated registered offender. To obtain automatic notification, the individual must notify the Illinois State Police, Sex Offender Registration, 801 South 7th Street, Suite 200 South, Springfield, Illinois 62703, in writing of their request to receive automatic notification. It is the responsibility of the requestor to notify the Illinois State Police of any updates with the requestor's current address.


  28. How do I obtain offense information in addition to what is listed on the web site?
  29. Additional information about an offender's conviction can be obtained by contacting the circuit clerk's office of the county in which the offender was convicted to get a copy of the offender's court case information. Additionally, to obtain criminal history information on an offender, a person may contact the Illinois State Police, Bureau of Identification at (815) 740-5160. A representative will be able to assist you in your request.


  30. How do photos get posted on the website? Why do some offenders not have a photo on file?
  31. By law, every time an offender registers, the local law enforcement agency must take a photo of the offender. The local law enforcement agency must forward a copy of the photo to the Illinois State Police to be added to the web site.

    Some offenders lack photos on file due to a photo not being taken at registration with the local law enforcement agency, or because the photo was never forwarded to the Illinois State Police. The Illinois State Police tries to ensure all offenders have a photo attached to their information. If you see an offender that lacks a photo on the web site, you should contact the local law enforcement agency to inquire about the lack of a photo.


  32. What does Non-Compliant mean?
  33. An offender becomes non-compliant when he or she fails to:

    • Register with the local law enforcement agency within 5 days of notification by the Illinois Department of Corrections or the Court; or
    • Register annually; or
    • Register quarterly (if applicable); or
    • Provide complete and accurate information to law enforcement personnel during registration; or
    • Change his or her address or other information without notifying law enforcement personnel.

    In addition to being Non-Compliant, a person may be listed with a Location Unknown status.


  34. What does Location Unknown mean?
  35. The offender has vacated his last reported address and has not provided new information regarding his current whereabouts to law enforcement as required by law. Law enforcement officials have confirmed that the offender has vacated the last known address by conducting a physical address verification of the offenders last reported address. The offender's current whereabouts at this time are unknown.

    Law enforcement agencies are required by law to verify an offender's residence in person at least once per year.

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